Technology

MIT Engineers create speakers as thin as paper

The new MIT speaker uses several layers of piezoelectric material with microscopic cavities that are responsible for generating sound through vibration, and that works even if the speaker is attached to a rigid surface.

Researchers at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics and Nanostructures at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have managed to create a speaker as thin as a sheet of paper, completely flexible and that can adhere to rigid surfaces, such as the wall of a room. Also, Read – The Most durable wireless in-ear headphones with Bluetooth

This new type of loudspeaker does not depend, like most, on a membrane that must physically move to produce sound. These membranes are what force traditional speakers to occupy a considerable volume, especially if you want to get great sound quality or high volume from them.

The new MIT speaker that are created by MIT Engineers , on the other hand, uses several layers of piezoelectric material with microscopic cavities that are responsible for generating sound through vibration, and that work even if the speaker is attached to a rigid surface. Also, Read – Samsung Galaxy Buds Pro Review

These cavities are the only thing that vibrates and they are only one-sixth of a hair thick. They move almost negligibly during their operation, barely a micron, but by having thousands of them spread over the surface, it is possible to displace a large amount of air.

The result is a sheet that not only emits a clear sound, like that of a conventional speaker but also consumes much less, just 100 milliwatts per square meter of emitting material. With a square meter, a similar result in sound pressure is achieved to that obtained by a conventional speaker powered by one watt of power. Also, Read – The Best PC Gaming Headphones With or Without a Mic

Its low consumption, its flexibility, and the possibility of adhering to a wall open up new application possibilities. The creators, for example, point out that perfectly soundproofed rooms could be created with a system similar to that used by noise-canceling headphones, which emit the opposite signal to the ambient noise to make it disappear. Also, Read – Sports Headphones: Best Headphones For Running, & Swimming

They also explain that since the sheet does not move – only the microscopic cavities vibrate – the material has a very high resonance level and can be used to emit and detect ultrasound, which also opens the door to visual applications. “If immersed in a liquid, these vibrating cavities could provide a new method of agitating chemicals, enabling chemical processing techniques that could use less energy than current methods,” they explain from MIT. Also, Read – What are the best headphones for sensitive ears

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